News

Alzheimer’s Australia Vic has called for funding for the development of six dementia-friendly communities across Victoria over the next three years. The call comes as part of a white paper which outlines the social and economic advantages of dementia-friendly communities. The paper was launched at the biannual Victorian Parliamentary Friends of Dementia meeting at Parliament House in Victoria.

SUMMARY OF STORY: New campaign launched today (Thursday June 11) highlighting that a staggering 1 in 13 people with dementia are now under the age of 65 – and a number of these people are in their 30s and 40s.

The “No Longer a Statistic” campaign reveals that there are specifically now at least 25,100 people under the age of 65 with dementia (referred to as “Younger Onset Dementia”).

By 2050 this will have jumped to 36,800. Campaign organisers say it’s a big issue for Australia and dementia is not an older person’s disease.

Alzheimer’s Australia CEO Carol Bennett says there is strong concern about the future of the only existing program currently helping people one-on-one with younger onset dementia in Australia. She highlights the highly successful Federal government funded program needs to be expanded because of the sheer level of need.

Alzheimer’s Australia NSW has congratulated its CEO, The Hon. John Watkins, who has today been awarded a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) in the General Division.

Mr Watkins has been given the award for significant service to the community through leadership positions with health organisations, to tertiary education, and to the Parliament of NSW.

Alzheimer’s Australia NSW Chair Jerry Ellis AO said it was a very well-deserved honour.

A new animated series created by the University of Sydney and Alzheimer’s Australia NSW uses cartoons to deliver a serious message about how to care for loved ones with dementia.

The cartoons for carers, called ‘CareToons’, are designed to help carers manage issues related to behavioural change which is estimated to effect between 60 and 90 per cent of people with dementia living at home.

Associate Professor Lee-Fay Low from the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Health Sciences said 1.2 million Australians are involved in caring for people with dementia and the project gives family carers online access to practical strategies that can help in stressful situations.

Caring for a loved one with dementia can be immensely challenging and dealing with changes in behaviour is one of the biggest sources of stress for carers,” Associate Professor Low said.

Three unique films are to be released to support people living with HIV and HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND).

The lives of people living with dementia can be improved through engagement with Montessori based activities, according to new findings resulting from a pilot project run by Alzheimer’s Australia Vic.

Alzheimer’s Australia NSW is encouraging Australians to Start2Talk about their future medical and financial decisions, coinciding with National Palliative Care Week that runs until 30 May.

Alzheimer’s Australia NSW CEO The Hon. John Watkins has encouraged people to talk with their loved ones about their future health and financial wishes should they ever be in a position not to make those decisions themselves.

“Our national resource, Start2Talk, is an interactive and comprehensive online resource to help people document their wishes,” Mr Watkins said.

“Taking a little time to set out your wishes now could mean less heartache for your loved ones in the future. It will leave them feeling confident with the decisions they make on your behalf, should that time come.”

Alzheimer’s Australia NSW, in partnership with Homelessness NSW, is hosting a series of free seminars for people working in the homelessness sector and aged care sector about homelessness and dementia.

The seminars will be held on Wednesday 27 May and Thursday 28 May and speakers include:

Alzheimer’s Australia is very pleased to be part of the Affinity installation at Vivid in Sydney this year. 

Alzheimer’s Australia NT Gala Ball, Saturday 16th May 2015 really was a ‘Night Of  A Thousand Memories’

Thanks and appreciation go out to all our kind and wonderful sponsors; Colliers International, Halikos Pty Ltd, H Hotel, MGA Whittles, NT Plumbing Maintenance and Bogarts Bar & Grill, who made the evening possible and so magical.

Our appreciation extends to the local generous businesses that donated wonderful gifts for the auctions…….a stunning $79,410 was raised on the evening!  

A special thank you to the organisers Myriam Giovanazzi and Lianna Georges and a heartfelt thank you to Hayley Maher and Kelly Monos.

Tonight’s Federal Budget has delivered a mixed bag of budget measures that will impact on Australia’s more than 342,000 people living with dementia, their carer’s and families.

Tonight’s Federal Budget has delivered a mixed bag of budget measures that will impact on Australia’s more than 342,000 people living with dementia, their carers and families.  

Carol Bennett, CEO Alzheimer’s Australia said “In the area of aged care and social services, funding of $73.7 million over four years for Home Care Packages that aim to increase consumer control, choice and flexibility through enhanced Consumer Directed Care (CDC) is welcome. There is still work to be done to ensure that these measures deliver on that promise by ensuring choice of providers, affordability and access to specialty dementia services.”

Wednesday 6 May 2015

Alzheimer’s Australia congratulates Senator Richard Di Natale and his co-deputy leaders, Senator Larissa Waters and Senator Scott Ludlam, following the announcement today of their appointment as the incoming Greens leadership team.

Carol Bennett, CEO Alzheimer’s Australia, said: “The Australian Greens have been ongoing supporters of improving the services and supports for the more than 340,000 people living with dementia in Australia.

Alzheimer’s Australia welcomes the announcement from Minister for Social Services, the Hon. Scott Morrison and Assistant Minister, Senator the Hon. Mitch Fifield of their commitment to inject $34 million worth of new grant funding into Australia’s aged care sector, including dementia care.

Two projects funded under this program include national dementia-specific programs that aim to provide flexible respite services to dementia carers and to train GPs and practice nurses in the timely diagnosis of dementia.

This page includes information from the 30th International Conference of Alzheimer’s Disease International in conjunction with Alzheimer’s Australia - Care, Cure and the Dementia Experience – A Global Challenge.

The Conference was held from 15-18 April 2015 at the Perth Convention and Exhibition Centre.

The Conference brought together world leaders in social and medical dementia research. Key speakers from Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Germany promoted awareness, challenged preconceived ideas of dementia care, and enabled people living with dementia to have their voice heard on an international stage.

Friday 17 April 2015

New research on the connection between head injuries and the risk of developing dementia will be presented at the Alzheimer’s Disease International and Alzheimer’s Australia National Conference in Perth.

Dr Adrienne Withall, from the School of Public Health & Community Medicine at UNSW Australia, is presenting research on the link between head injuries and the early onset of dementia.

Thursday 16 April 2015

New developments in eye imaging technology used to detect dementias were outlined today by American and Australian dementia researchers at the Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) conference in Perth.  The remarkable thing about this form of detection is that some trials suggest eye imaging may detect Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias 10-20 years before symptoms appear. 

New research on the connection between head injuries and the risk of developing dementia will be presented at the Alzheimer’s Disease International and Alzheimer’s Australia National Conference in Perth.

Dr Adrienne Withall, from the School of Public Health & Community Medicine at UNSW Australia, is presenting research on the link between head injuries and the early onset of dementia.
“We can say with confidence that a significant head injury, one that results in loss of consciousness, or fracture, increases your risk of dementia,” Dr Withall said.

New developments in eye imaging technology used to detect dementias were outlined today by American and Australian dementia researchers at the Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) conference in Perth.

Some trials suggest eye imaging may detect Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias 10-20 years before symptoms appear.

Retinal specialist and Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology at Duke University Medical Center, Dr Eleonora Lad, stressed the importance of early detection and highlighted that there are few reliable methods to detect the early signs of dementia.

The Palaszczuk Government has partnered with Alzheimer’s Australia (Qld) to launch an initiative to help ensure Queenslanders living with dementia who go missing are able to get home safely. 

Police Minister Jo-Ann Miller joined Alzheimer’s Australia (Qld) Chief Executive Officer Victoria Beedle to launch the Safely Home program, which will help police and members of the community reunite a missing person with their loved ones faster.

Minister Miller said the new bracelets were a joint initiative of the Queensland Police Service and Alzheimer’s Australia (Qld) and could be worn by people with dementia who are at risk of wandering and becoming disoriented or lost.