News

Alzheimer’s Australia Vic is calling on the State Government to invest three million dollars into creating a dementia-friendly Victoria in response to soaring prevalence.

Alzheimer’s Australia Vic is calling on the State Government to invest three million dollars into creating a dementia-friendly Victoria in response to soaring prevalence.

Alzheimer’s Australia Vic is calling on the State Government to invest three million dollars into creating a dementia-friendly Victoria in response to soaring prevalence.

Dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, is now the second leading cause of death in Australians (rising from third place in previous years), with 11,000 deaths recorded in 2013, according to figures released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in its 2013 report on causes of death in Australia.

The report stated that the number of deaths as a result of dementia increased by more than five per cent in the previous year and more than 30 per cent in the past five years.

Dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease, is now the second leading cause of death in Australians (rising from third place in previous years), with 11,000 deaths recorded in 2013, according to figures released today by the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) in its 2013 report on causes of death in Australia.

The report stated that the number of deaths as a result of dementia increased by more than five per cent in the previous year and more than 30 per cent in the past five years.

Listen to an interview with community fundraiser Graham Plant on SEN’s Morning Glory about his running the equivalent of five and a half marathons in six days across the Sahara desert, to raise money for Alzheimer’s Australia Vic.

Details of Graham’s adventure and how to support him can be found here - http://www.thememoryjogger.com.au/author/graham/

Calls for health care professionals to support people with dementia to stay safe on the roads.

Alzheimer’s Australia Vic is calling on General Practitioners and other health professionals to actively support people living with dementia through the challenges associated with driving.

There’s no age limit on sexual activity.

With a rapidly ageing population, a widespread conversation about the largely unspoken issues associated with sex and ageing is long overdue.

"The concept of an older couple in their 80s or 90s holding hands or kissing one another on the cheek is considered to be a beautiful thing. In contrast, the concept of the same elderly couple having sex tends to make people feel uncomfortable. Where do these attitudes come from and why don’t we talk about them?" asks Maree McCabe, CEO Alzheimer’s Australia Vic.

Thursday 5 March 2015

Alzheimer’s Australia says the political spotlight needs to be refocused on the economic impact of dementia and other conditions that are driving massive increases in our health expenditure, following the release today of the 2015 Intergenerational Report that projected a 5.7% increase in health expenditure by 2055 under current legislation with spending per person expected to more than double.

4 March 2015

50 people with dementia and their carers from around Australia converged on Parliament House in Canberra over the past two days to send a clear message to parliamentarians about the need for community awareness and programs to reduce the fear, stigma and social isolation frequently associated with a diagnosis of dementia.

In an announcement made today by Senator the Hon Mitch Fifield, Assistant Minister for Social Services, the government has re-affirmed its commitment to quality Aged Care, detailing the formation of the much awaited Aged Care Quality Advisory Council.

Alzheimer’s Australia CEO Carol Bennett has welcomed this move as evidence that the government is committed to ensuring that the needs of those living in aged care are made a priority.


Media enquiries:
Sam Lynch 
Communications Manager
T: (08) 6271 1056 M: 0419971713 E: sam.lynch@dementia.org.au 

 

The Dementia Australia Dementia Research Foundation (AADRF) 2015 Grants Program - Round 1 will open from 9am (AEDT) on Wednesday March 4th, 2015.

In Round 1 the Foundation is offering a total of seventeen $50,000 capacity building project grants for new and early career researchers.

Fifty consumers including people with dementia, their families and carers have today convened at a Consumer Summit at Parliament House in Canberra to voice their needs to politicians and to call for action on dementia-related issues.

 

Monday 2 March 2015

Music and dementia:

Watch as music lights up Henry’s life at Melbourne film premiere

Alzheimer’s Australia Vic is proud to be sponsoring Alive Inside, a film that reveals the transformative impact music therapy can have on people living with dementia.

A gentleman named Henry is just one example of the many people featured, whose lives are visibly enriched through their engagement with music.

According to National President Alzheimer’s Australia, Graeme Samuel AC; “for decades, consumers have been calling for a program that provides individualised, proactive, person-centred support. This approach is particularly important for people with younger onset dementia, who in the past have been shuffled between the disability and aged care systems,” Mr Samuel was addressing the Senate Standing Committee on Community Affairs on the adequacy of existing residential care arrangements available for young people with severe physical, mental or intellectual disabilities in Australia.

“Their calls for help were answered with the implementation of the government-funded Younger Onset Dementia Key Worker Program (YODKWP), which has so far provided thousands of Australians with younger onset dementia with health professionals to assist them in navigating this complex service environment and linking them to appropriate services and supports,” Mr Samuel said. 

“Unfortunately, it now seems like the government is planning to dissolve this important program into the mainstream services of NDIS. This is an alarming development for Australians who have received a diagnosis of younger onset dementia as it means they will be left to fend for themselves in the NDIS system where there is no guarantee their needs can or will be met.” 

In the lead-up to the NSW state election next month, Alzheimer’s Australia NSW has called on the major political parties to commit to a comprehensive statewide dementia strategy covering health, transport, policing, housing and other government services.  

Alzheimer’s Australia (Qld) today congratulated the ALP on its historic victory in the Queensland State Election.

CEO Victoria Beedle said Premier Annastacia Palaszcuk’s $20 million pledge for dementia respite would now become a reality.

“The ALP’s election victory is also a win for every Queenslander living with dementia,” Ms Beedle said.

“Dementia respite is a critical service that has been significantly under-funded for too long; this election result is welcome news for more than 63,000 Queenslanders and their families for whom respite is a lifeline,” said Ms Beedle.

Alzheimer’s Australia has urged the Federal Government to expand and continue investment in dementia-specific care and support services such as the Younger Onset Dementia Key Worker Program (YODKWP).

Alzheimer’s Australia CEO Carol Bennett said: “There is overwhelming evidence suggesting that the unique needs of people with dementia, particularly people with younger onset dementia, cannot be supported through mainstream health and care services.

“The proposed transition of the YODKWP into the NDIS may mean that people with younger onset dementia and their families will not be able to get the services they need.

“People with younger onset dementia may be forced to seek access to intensive and expensive residential care services earlier, creating significant cost to the Government.

Alzheimer’s Australia has urged the Federal Government to expand and continue investment in dementia-specific care and support services such as the Younger Onset Dementia Key Worker Program (YODKWP).

Alzheimer’s Australia CEO Carol Bennett said: “There is overwhelming evidence suggesting that the unique needs of people with dementia, particularly people with younger onset dementia, cannot be supported through mainstream health and care services.

Alzheimer’s Australia has in a budget submission today urged the Government to extend the funding for the world’s first publicly-funded dementia prevention program, Your Brain Matters, in the 2015/16 Federal Budget. 

Alzheimer’s Australia CEO, Carol Bennett, said: “Australia has been a world leader in educating the Australian public of the risks of dementia through the Your Brain Matters program, a role that has attracted international acclaim including from World Dementia Envoy Dr Dennis Gillings.

“The program has made considerable inroads in educating Australians, but there is much work to be done with many Australians still unaware of the simple lifestyle changes that could reduce a person’s risk of dementia in later life.”