Coping with behaviour changes

Aggressive behaviours

Aggressive behaviour may sometimes occur as a result of dementia. This page discusses the causes of aggressive behaviours, suggests some ways to manage and some sources of help. 

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Agitated behaviours

Agitated behaviours can be a very concerning symptom of dementia. This page discusses some of the causes of agitated behaviours and suggests ways to prevent and manage them if they occur. 

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Anxious behaviours

For some people anxiety may be a distressing symptom of dementia. This page discusses the causes of anxious behaviours and suggests some ways to manage them effectively, as well as some sources of additional help. 

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Depression and dementia

This page looks at depression in people with dementia, how to recognise it, and importantly, ways in which it may be treated. 

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Disinhibited behaviours

Changes in the behaviour of people are very common. Sometimes this can include behaviours that are tactless, inappropriate or offensive. These are usually called disinhibited behaviours. This page describes the signs and causes of disinhibited behaviours, as well as some sources of help. 

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Hallucinations and false ideas

Hallucinations and false ideas such as paranoia and delusions may be very distressing symptoms of dementia. This page discusses some of the causes, and suggests ways that families and carers can deal with them.

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Problem solving

This page discusses some ways to think about any changes in behaviours that are occurring as a result of dementia. It describes a problem solving approach that may help you manage any behaviours if and when they arise. 

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Sundowning

This page explains why some people with dementia are particularly restless in the afternoon and evening, a condition sometimes known as sundowning. It gives some practical advice to families and carers for managing sundowning. 

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Wandering

This page looks at the wandering behaviour of some people with dementia. The reasons for wandering are discussed, as well as some suggestions for ways to manage it.

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Further Help

More information about dementia is available in the Help Sheets section of our website or to find out more, call the National Dementia Helpline on 1800 100 500.