Mitchell McMaster

Body, Brain, Life Project for Mild Cognitive Impairment (BBL-MCI): A randomised controlled trial of multidomain dementia prevention for mild cognitive impairment

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Mitchell McMaster headshot
Award
2015 Award: AADRF - Dementia Collaborative Research Centre Half-funded PhD Scholarship
Project Snapshot

Mild cognitive Impairment (MCI) is a condition in which there are problems in memory, thinking, planning and/or language, as diagnosed by doctor. These problems are not severe enough to be diagnosed with dementia, however people with MCI have a high risk of developing dementia in the future. BBL-MCI is a 12-week program to educate participants about dementia and make lifestyle changes to diet, physical exercise, brain exercise and improve overall health to lower dementia risk.

Detailed Project Summary

BBL-MCI will conduct a randomised controlled trial (RCT) to test the effectiveness of a 12-week intervention to prevent further cognitive decline and risk of developing dementia for those with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). Individuals with MCI are at a high risk of developing dementia and it is still unclear whether the condition is modifiable or reversible.


The intervention is comprised of seven modules: dementia literacy, dementia risk factors, physical activity, nutrition, social engagement, cognitive engagement, and health self-management to enable coverage of all modifiable risk factors. These modules will provide information as well as individually-tailored practical components of physical activity, nutrition and cognitive activity. Outcomes to be assessed are cognition and dementia risk, as compared with an active control group.

This multidomain, secondary prevention intervention will complement multidomain, primary intervention methods such as Alzheimer’s Australia’s “Your Brain Matter’s” campaign, currently taking place in the community.

Where are they now?

Mr McMaster is currently completing his PhD at the Centre for Research on Ageing, Health and Wellbeing, The Australian National University.